sacrohysteropexy

What is a sacrohysteropexy?

Sacrohysteropexy is a medical procedure for dealing with uterine prolapse. Although the procedure has been around for many years, it is still relatively unheard of by many women. However, it can be an effective way of treating prolapse, and most importantly, it is far less invasive than undergoing a full hysterectomy.

One of the main problems with having a hysterectomy (apart from the intense trauma and long recovery period) is that in up to 50% of cases, it results in urinal incontinence. This is due to the close proximity of the bladder to the uterus. Uterus removal also takes away any support the bladder has and as a result, can interfere with bladder function.

Uterine prolapse is a widely experienced condition

A prolapse of the uterus is something that many women experience. It can happen because of childbirth, as a result of the enormous stretching of the muscle tissue. Also, in later life, when women go through the menopause, the lack of oestrogen that typifies menopause, results in the floor of the pelvis losing its elastic strength.

Although uterine prolapse is not dangerous, it is extremely uncomfortable. When the womb descends, it will rub on any underwear and this can result in the area becoming infected and an ulcer forming on the cervix.

A sacrohysteropexy is far less invasive than a hysterectomy.

While a hysterectomy is an effective prolapse surgery procedure, it is very invasive. It leaves patients very weak and they can take months to fully recover. A sacrohysteropexy, on the other hand, is a laparoscopic procedure which, because it is far less invasive, has a fast recovery time – as quick as two weeks.

The sacrohysteropexy operation involves the insertion of a small piece of flexible mesh which is used to raise the uterus and hold it firmly in position so that it cannot drop.

Although there has been some adverse publicity in recent weeks, the insertion of a mesh sling is a procedure that is supported by the MHRA (Medicines and Healthcare products Regulatory authority). It is a cleaner entry method, entered abdominally and not vaginally. It is especially relevant to women who have pelvic problems but still wish to have babies.

It’s important to find the right clinic and use a top surgeon

Finding the right clinic and the right surgeon to carry out the procedure is important. Many women choose to use the services The Pelvic Clinic; a clinic where Mr Jonathon Broome has carried out in excess of 1,000 successful sacrohysteropexies. To find out more about how we can help you or the women in your life, contact us today.

 

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